International Crane Foundation

A pair of cranes

When Ron Sauey and George Archibald founded the International Crane Foundation (ICF) in 1973, little was known about the breeding biology of cranes, and some species had never been hatched in captivity. Since then, the International Crane Foundation has continued to inspire people and conduct research on cranes around the world, doing much to promote habitat preservation.

Eagle Optics partners with ICF

Jim Harris, of the International Crane Foundation, and Sergei Smirenski, of the Muraviovka Park for Sustainable Land Use, summarize Eagle Optics' involvement:

"We wish to express our heartfelt gratitude for your most generous donation of 13 new binoculars, a new spotting scope and a tripod (total retail value of $2,650) to ICF and its affiliate, Muraviovka Park for Sustainable Land Use. Since affordable, good, lightweight field binoculars and, especially, scopes are not available in Russia, these excellent optics will be extensively used for our field research, conservation efforts, and educational programs in the U.S. and abroad — in particular, for education and visitor programs run by ICF and the Muraviovka Park in Eastern Siberia."

"During the summer 2002, two binoculars donated by your company made birding excursions for Russian, American, and Chinese teachers and students a wonderful educational experience. These were the first Eagle Optics binoculars ever seen in that part of Russia!"

"Sergei and other researchers will be using the Eagle Optics Ranger binocular during their field work in Russia, and the other two will remain here at ICF for use by foreign conservationalists visiting Wisconsin, and for field research efforts by ICF staff."

"During the camp in Muraviovka Park, we set up the Raven Spotting Scope and a tripod on the balcony of the Educational Center so camp participants could watch the nesting cranes and storks closely without disturbing the birds."

"Thanks to Eagle Optics' equipment, other visitors who come to the Park in growing numbers will now be able to see rare cranes, storks and other wildlife closely and clearly."